William shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line. Sonnet 130 Analysis 2019-02-21

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Sonnet 130

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

William Shakespeare is an example of a poet and writer of this time period, and possible one of the most recognised for his work. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound: I grant I never saw a goddess go, My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground: And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. In the next line, Shakespeare uses the metaphor of the North Star to discuss love. The poet must be very secure in his love for his mistress — and hers for him — for him to be as disparaging as he is, even in jest — a security he did not enjoy with the young man. Instead of comparing his love to something she is, he is comparing his love to something she is not: his love is not like the sun; her lips are not even as orange as coral; her cheeks are not like a rose.

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Analysis of Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

One final note: To Elizabethan readers, Shakespeare's comparison of hair to 'wires' would refer to the finely-spun gold threads woven into fancy hair nets. So it's not necessarily bad that she has frizzy black hair. While traditional love poems in the 18th century generally focused on glorifying a woman's beauty, Sonnet 130 written by William Shakespeare goes against the conventional culture of love poems and instead describes the realistic nature of his object of affection. So the mistress in the poem is seen as a low standard woman, not having a good education. In one sonnet the only reason the speaker loves his woman is because she looks beautiful, and in the other the speaker loves her although she does not look handsome in the eyes of most men. Despite her shortcomings, the poet insists that he loves her, not because she is a goddess, not because she is an unattainable beauty, but because she is his, and because she is real. Many poets of the time used this term as a benchmark of beauty, including Spenser: Some angel she had been, Her long loose yellow locks like golden wire, Sprinkled with pearl, and pearling flowers atween, Do like a golden mantle her attire, And being crowned with a garland green.

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SparkNotes: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 146

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

Here though, the mistress's hair is compared to black wires sticking out of the top of her head. Summary Sonnet 130 is a parody of the Dark Lady, who falls too obviously short of fashionable beauty to be extolled in print. When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself and curse my fate, wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope,. And yet, I think she is as rare a woman as any woman who has been falsely compared to these paragons of beauty. On one hand the speaker starts in nature with the coral under the sea and ends with a hovering goddess high over the ground. Is this poem a touching paean to inner beauty opposed to superficiality or is it misogynist trash? Free Publication of your term paper, essay, interpretation, bachelor's thesis, master's thesis, dissertation or textbook -.

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Analysis of Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare. The first 126 sonnets seem to be speaking to a young man with whom Shakespeare was very close. However, in the last lines we see that the persona chooses the real woman with all her imperfections. Sonnet 130 is a pleasure to read for its simplicity and frankness of expression. Since this is a Shakespearean sonnet, it is composed of 14 lines and uses the iambic pentameter form. So little record of his private life exists that most of what people know about Shakespeare stems from scholarly discussion and speculation, rather than actual records or facts. The speaker takes an object from nature; therefore she as a part of nature is not a perfect creation.

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Shakespeare’s Sonnets Sonnet 130

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

In the final couplet, the speaker proclaims his love for his mistress by declaring that he makes no false comparisons, the implication being that other poets do precisely that. Scholars have attempted to illustrate the difference of tone between them by stating that the Fair Youth sequence refers to spiritual love, while the Dark Lady sequence refers to sexual passion. Possibly it satisfies more fully the popular ideal of the likeness of a great creative poet than does the bust or print just referred to. This is another example of ridiculous comparisons in usual love poems. The comparisons made from the coral to the goddess are rising up. The reader gets the feeling that there is a real man talking about his love.

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SparkNotes: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 130

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

Next, the summer temperature is described as hot in lines five and six. Shakespeare paints this picture using a wonderful combination of details. A sonnet is one of these forms. A graceful goddess is the most perfect being the speaker can think of. He addresses her as if she cannot compare to the ideal appearances women are expected to look like in that of the natural world.

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Sonnet 130 Analysis Research Paper

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

As a result you start to identify with the speaking voice and you can understand better what the speaker is talking about. Shakespeare's Sonnets, Edited with Analytic Commentary. In this sonnet, Shakespeare draws on sight, sound and smell when he compares his mistress' eyes to the sun, her lips to red coral, her breasts to white snow, her hair to black wires, her cheeks to red and white roses, her breath to perfume and her voice to music. Perfumes smell sweeter than the breath that comes out of her mouth. Many poets through history have written about love, this essay will examine how love is presented in 2 poems.

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My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

This last line is an attack on men who think a woman is only an object to look on, not a person to look into. He is stating in these lines that his lover's eyes, lips, or breast are no comparison to the beautiful things, such as the sunshine rays of the sun, the redness of coral, and the whiteness of snow. It was one of the basic things women were taught while they were living at home. Contemporary poets, such as Sidney and Watson, would use the Petrarchan sonnet for its poetic form, whereas in Sonnet 130, Shakespeare mocks all the conventions of it. Lines 7-8 And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.

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SparkNotes: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 146

william shakespeare sonnet 130 analysis line by line

Together they raised two daughters: Susanna, who was born in 1583, and Judith whose twin brother died in boyhood , born in 1585. Shakespeare utilizes a new structure, through which the straightforward theme of his lover's simplicity can be developed in the three quatrains and neatly concluded in the final couplet. She holds a Bachelors Degree from Sarah Lawrence College and a Masters Degree in education from Mercy College. This creates the effect of an expanding and developing argument, and neatly prevents the poem—which does, after all, rely on a single kind of joke for its first twelve lines—from becoming stagnant. Shakespeare wrote more than thirty plays. It is not easy to account for this, since the Chandos Portraitportrait is certainly not the first in point of genuineness, whatever may be its degree of artistic merit. William Shakespeare uses an iambic pentameter throughout the poem.

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